Book Review: Tide and Tempest by Elizabeth Ludwig

Book Review: Tide and Tempest by Elizabeth Ludwig

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When I first selected this book, I didn’t realize it was part of a series and I had ended up selecting book three. So, for the longest time I put off reading the book. The thrill was gone, because from past experience, books in a series is merely a continuation of the previous. Usually they tie in together and if you haven’t read the previous books, then you are lost. But finally, deciding enough time had passed I picked it up and began to read. And then I couldn’t stop. Despite this being a third book, and there were a few mentions of previous characters, the book was quite interesting. The previous story wasn’t necessary, although it may have been helpful. Essentially it carried itself.

It was intriguing, the plot for me carried along well, and it kept me interested to know what happens around the next corner, or in this case, chapter. The story wasn’t overly predictive, there were times where I was surprised in the outcome of an event, and to me, that is a well written book. I found that I was transported to that time and place, and could feel the sweat or the pounding of the fists.

The only thing that I thought could use some work was the back cover. It was accurate, but it really and truly didn’t tell the story about what happened between the pages of the book. The orphanage of Tillie’s was not hardly worth a mention on the back. It did play a part, in an roundabout way. The story was so much deeper and more involved.

That said, this is a great book and I’d willingly recommend it to others to read. Don’t worry about it being out of sequence from the previous two books, it stands on it’s own.

I received this book from Bethany House Publishers for my honest review. I did not receive any other compensation and all thoughts and opinions are strictly my own.

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Book Review: A Promise to Remember by Kathryn Cushman

Book Review: A Promise to Remember by Kathryn Cushman

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I just finished reading this book that I downloaded to my Kindle. To be honest, I have read only one other book by Cushman, and I hadn’t been impressed with it. So unimpressed, I had no intentions on reading any other of her books. However, this one slipped past me, and to be honest, I’m glad it did.

The basic premise of the book: “When a car accident kills two teens from opposite sides of the tracks, the aftermath threatens to tear a community apart.”

You aren’t given the details of the tragedy, merely the outcome of how both sides are dealing with the aftermath of the accident. You know it was a car accident, but the rest of the details come trickling through later, and even then, you are still left in the dark. Such as where was each son headed or going, and how did it happen. But that wasn’t the point of the story, although it did leave me pondering several times.

The story switched back and forth between the two families, the trauma and stress that each decision has on the other members of the family. The best part of the story is the end, but of course. But I liked the very last page of the story, a statement made by the daughter.

Book Review: Echoes of Mercy by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Book Review: Echoes of Mercy by Kim Vogel Sawyer

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“When a suspicious accident occurs at the famous Dinsmore Chocolate Factory in Sinclair, Kansas, Caroline Lang goes undercover as a factory worker to investigate the circumstances surrounding the event and how the factory treats its youngest employees—the child workers.”

As always, there is more to the book than just the snipet description on the back of the book. Caroline Lang is a young woman who is part of the Labor Commission who goes undercover to research labor in American corporations. When a death of a fellow agent occurs, Caroline is called into investigate, the death and complete the work of the previous agent.

While there, she becomes friends with one of the workers, and befriends a young girl, and encourages her to go to school, rather than work in the factories, because she believes education is much more important.

All in all, I did enjoy the book, although the area where the kids run off I found a bit too much. I understand the purpose in the outcome of the book, but as I read it, I kept wondering…why?

Typically I do not like multiple voices in a book, because I’m always have to look up and make sure I’m reading the correct person. This one actually seemed to flow pretty well, and I didn’t get too confused.

I’d keep this book to reread, if anything, to see the details I missed the first time around in my eagerness to find out the end result of the story.

Note: I was provided with a free paperback copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion by the Blogging For Books review program. I was not further compensated for reviewing this product and all thoughts and sentiments expressed above are completely my own and unbiased.